Fraserburgh is a major white fish port and its harbour, therefore, plays a central role in the town’s economy.

A recently completed project was the multi-million pound upgrade to the North basin being deepened by five feet to enable larger fishing boats and other vessels to use the harbour.

For the seafood industry to prosper it has to have the capacity to freeze a large proportion of the catch so that it can be distributed throughout the United Kingdom and into international markets. Freezing and cold storage are energy intensive. Consequently, running alongside the harbour development, was a major upgrade to electricity infrastructure in the area.

Starting from existing substations next to the Fraserburgh campus of the North East Scotland College on Henderson Street, W M Donald ran two 11kV electricity cables down to the harbour area. According to Project Manager, Willie Merson, the challenge was to work safely and minimise disruption to local business, pedestrians and traffic flows: ‘The 2.5km cable run passed through the busy town centre. Well planned traffic management was key with several 3 and 4 way junctions to control. We made extensive use of suction excavation on the project as we were working in areas criss-crossed by existing gas, water and electricity services. Due to extensive planning before arriving on site we were able to complete the project within the fourteen-week time window.’

Before 1592, Fraserburgh was known as Faithlie or The Broch. The harbour is still often referred to as the Broch harbour. A broch is an iron-age drystone hollow-walled structure found only in Scotland.